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Archive for the ‘autism grants’ Category

Funds will enable parents, teachers, students,
individuals with autism and other stakeholders to
attend leading autism research conference

(January 7, 2014—New York, NY)–The Autism Science Foundation, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to supporting and funding autism research, today announced that it is offering a limited number of grants to parents of children with autism, individuals with autism, and other stakeholders to support attendance at the International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR), to be held in Atlanta, Georgia from May 14-17, 2014. Awards of up to $1000 can be used to cover registration, travel, accommodations, meals and other directly related expenses, including childcare or special accommodations to enable individuals with autism to participate.

IMFAR is an annual scientific meeting, convened each spring, to promote, exchange and disseminate the latest scientific findings in autism research and to stimulate research progress in understanding the nature, causes, and treatments for autism spectrum disorders. IMFAR is the annual meeting of the International Society for Autism Research (INSAR).

“We are thrilled to be able to offer this opportunity for a fourth year, and to give back to the autism stakeholder community in a research-focused way,” said Alison Singer, president of the Autism Science Foundation.

“Participating in IMFAR with an ASF travel grant in 2012 was an eye opening experience” said Marjorie Madfis, mother of a daughter with autism and founder of Yes She Can, an organization that helps girls with autism develop employment skills.  “I was particularly impressed with the research examining the unique needs of girls and women, and on development of social skills, and I incorporated some of this research into the work we do at Yes She Can.”

To apply for a travel grant, send a letter or video to grants@autismsciencefoundation.org describing why you want to attend IMFAR and explaining how you would share what you learn there with the broader autism community. Letters should be sent as Microsoft Word documents of no more than 2 double-spaced pages, 12-point type, “Arial” font, with standard margins. In the subject line please write: “IMFAR Travel Grant Application”.  Videos should be two minutes or less and should be emailed to the same address as above with the same subject line. Letters & videos must be received by February 21, 2014. Recipients will be announced in March.  Past recipients have included individuals with autism, parents of children with autism, siblings, outreach coordinators at autism research centers, special education teachers, graduate and undergraduate students, journalists, and others.  Additional application information is available at http://www.autismsciencefoundation.org/what-we-fund/apply-for-IMFAR-travel-grant

The Autism Science Foundation (ASF) is a 501(c)(3) public charity whose mission is to support autism research by providing funding to those who conduct, facilitate, publicize and disseminate autism research. ASF also provides information about autism to the general public and serves to increase awareness of autism spectrum disorders and the needs of individuals and families affected by autism.

The International Society for Autism Research (INSAR) is a scientific and professional organization devoted to advancing knowledge about autism spectrum disorders. INSAR was created in 2001. The society runs the annual scientific meeting – the International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR) – and publishes the research journal “Autism Research”.

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Contact Information:
Meredith Gilmer
Community Relations Manager
Autism Science Foundation
mgilmer@autismsciencefoundation.org
28 West 39th Street, #502
New York, NY 10018

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By Matthew Maenner

Early identification of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) continues to be an important public health objective.  Research has shown that ASD can be reliably identified in children by around 2 years of age, and public health campaigns promote the detection of developmental “early warning signs”  that may indicate ASD.  Despite these efforts, there is a considerable gap between the age ASD is detected in clinical research, and the age at which children are identified as having ASD in typical community settings.  Previous population-based studies have shown that the average age of ASD identification in the community is less than ideal (at 5.7 years), and there is little information about whether these “early warning signs” lead to earlier ASD identification in everyday practice.

Our new study uses data from the CDC Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network to answer two questions about how ASD behavioral features are described by community professionals and whether these behaviors are associated with the age of ASD identification. The ADDM Network identified 2,757 8-year-old children that met the surveillance case definition for ASD (based on the DSM-IV-TR criteria) in 2006.

616 combination

First, we examined the frequency and patterns of diagnostic behaviors that lead to a child meeting the diagnostic criteria for ASD (based on the DSM-IV-TR).  There are many different ways to meet the diagnostic criteria for ASD.  For example, there are 616 combinations of the 12 behavioral criteria that fulfill the minimum number (6) and pattern needed for “Autistic Disorder” alone.  Although there was considerable variability between individuals with ASD, boys and girls had similar patterns of documented behaviors, as did black and white children overall.  Among the 2,757 children, the most commonly documented behaviors were impairments in emotional reciprocity (90%), delays in spoken language (89%), and impairments in the ability to hold a conversation (86%).  The least frequently documented behaviors were lack of sharing enjoyment or interests (49%) and lack of spontaneous or pretend play (57%).

Our second question was whether particular ASD behaviors (such as those highlighted by the CDC’s “Learn the Signs” campaign) are actually associated with earlier ASD identification in typical community settings.  We found that the both the total number and types of diagnostic behaviors in a child’s record were strongly associated with the age that they were identified as having ASD.  Children with all 12 behavioral symptoms were diagnosed at a median age of 3.8 years of age, compared to 8.2 years for children with only 7 of the 12 behaviors.  Additionally, children with documented impairments in nonverbal communication, pretend play, inflexible routines, or repetitive motor behaviors tended to have an earlier age at ASD identification than children who did have these features in their records.  Children with impairments in peer relations, conversational ability, or idiosyncratic speech were more likely to be identified as having ASD at a later age.

These findings give us a clearer understanding of how ASD diagnoses are made in the community, and help inform efforts to maximize early identification and intervention among children with ASDs.  It may be more difficult to detect ASD at an early age among children with fewer symptoms, or symptoms that are most apparent at later ages (such as getting along with peers or conversational ability). A recent national telephone survey reported an increase in ASD prevalence among young teenagers, and parents were more likely to describe their later-diagnosed children as having “mild” ASD.  It’s possible that increased awareness and intensified screening for ASD could lead to more individuals being identified at both earlier and later ages. Strategies to improve early ASD identification and interventions could benefit by considering the manner in which individuals may meet ASD criteria.

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Today we opened our applications process for the 2013 Pre- and Post-doctoral Training Awards for graduate students, medical students and postdoctoral fellows interested in pursuing careers in basic and clinical research relevant to autism spectrum disorders. In the past three years, ASF has funded over $700,000 in pre- and post-doctoral grants.

“Pre- and post-doctoral fellowships not only build our knowledge about what causes autism and how best to treat it, but also build our future by encouraging outstanding young investigators to dedicate their careers to autism research,” said Alison Singer, president of ASF.

“We are so grateful to all our donors and volunteers who have come together to support autism research and who make these grants possible,” said Karen London, co-founder of ASF.

The proposed training must be scientifically linked to autism. ASF will consider for training purposes all areas of related basic and clinical research including but not limited to:

  • Human behavior across the lifespan (language, learning, communication, social function, epilepsy, sleep, repetitive disorders)
  • Neurobiology (anatomy, development, neuro-imaging)
  • Pharmacology
  • Neuropathology
  • Human genetics/genomics
  • Immunology
  • Molecular and cellular mechanisms
  • Studies employing model organisms and systems
  • Studies of treatment and service delivery

Applications must be received by November 16, 2012. Additional information about the RFA can be found at www.autismsciencefoundation.org/ApplyForaGrant.html.

Grant applications will be reviewed by members of ASF’s Science Advisory Board (SAB) and other highly qualified reviewers. Current SAB members include Dr. Joseph Buxbaum (Mt. Sinai School of Medicine); Dr. Emanuel DiCicco-Bloom (UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School); Dr. Sharon Humiston (University of Rochester); Dr. Bryan King (University of Washington, Seattle); Dr. Ami Klin (Emory University); Dr. Harold Koplewicz (The Child Mind Institute); Dr. Eric London (New York Institute for Basic Research); Dr. Catherine Lord (New York Center for Autism and the Developing Brain); Dr. David Mandell (University of Pennsylvania/CHOP); Dr. Kevin Pelphrey (Yale Child Study Center) and Dr. Matthew State (Yale Medical School).

To learn more about the ASF’s grant programs, and to read about projects funded through this mechanism in prior years, visit www.autismsciencefoundation.org

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Nine new projects to be funded

Today we announced the recipients of our annual pre- and postdoctoral fellowships.  Six postdoctoral and three predoctoral grants will be awarded to student/mentor teams conducting research in autism interventions, treatment targets, early diagnosis, biomarkers, and animal models. This represents a 50% increase over last year’s six pre- & postdoctoral grants.

“Last week, when the CDC announced a 23% increase in autism prevalence, the autism community demanded more research to understand what is causing autism and to develop better treatments for individuals with autism,” said ASF Co-Founder Karen London. “We are proud to be able to increase our research funding in response to this national health crisis and we are so grateful to all our donors and volunteers who have come together to support autism research and make this funding increase possible.

This year, ASF will fund $330,000 in fellowship grants. In three years of operations, we have funded $790,000 in pre- and postdoctoral grants.

“ASF attracts excellent applicants across the board, and the top choices are exceptional people representing a broad set of perspectives on autism science,” said Dr. Matthew State, Chair of the ASF Scientific Advisory Board and the Donald J. Cohen Professor of Genetics and of Psychiatry at the Yale Child Study Center & Co-Director, Yale Program on Neurogenetics.

Two projects are co-funded by the FRAXA Research Foundation and the Phelan-McDermid Syndrome Foundation. Additional direct funding for ASF’s pre- and postdoctoral grant program was provided by Bailey’s Team and the Rural India Supporting Trust.

The following projects were selected for 2012 funding:

Postdoctoral Fellowships:

  • Inna Fishman/Ralph-Axel Muller: San Diego State University
    Multimodal Imaging of Social Brain Networks in ASD
  • Karyn Heavner/Craig Newschaffer: Drexel University
    Evaluating Epidemiological and Biostatistical Challenges in the EARLI Investigation
  • Haruki Higashimori/Yongjie Yang: Tufts University
    Role of Astrocytic Glutamate Transporter GLT1 in Fragile X
    Co-funded by: FRAXA Research Foundation
  • April Levin/Charles Nelson: Children’s Hospital Boston
    Identifying Early Biomarkers for Autism Using EEG Connectivity
  • Klaus Libertus/Rebecca Landa: Kennedy Krieger Institute
    Effects of Active Motor & Social Training on Developmental Trajectories in Infants at High Risk for ASD
  • Oleksandr Shcheglovitov/Ricardo Dolmetsch: Stanford University School of Medicine
    Using Induced-Pluripotent Stem Cells to Study Phelan McDermid Syndrome
    Co-funded by: Phelan McDermid Syndrome Foundation

Predoctoral Fellowships:

  • Nina Leezenbaum/Jana Iverson: University of Pittsburgh
    Postural and Vocal Development during the First Year of Life in Infants at HeightenedBiological Risk for ASD
  • Jennifer Moriuchi/Ami Klin: Emory University Marcus Autism Center
    Gender and Cognitive Profile as Predictors of Functional Outcomes in School-Aged Children with ASD 
  • Rebecca Simon/Karen Bales: University of California, Davis  MIND Institute
    The Role of Serotonin in Social Bonding in Animal Models

Learn more about the projects selected for funding here – http://www.autismsciencefoundation.org/current-grantees.

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IMFAR Stakeholder Travel Awards Will Support Parents, Siblings, Individuals with Autism & Graduate Students

We are delighted to announce the recipients of the 2012 IMFAR Travel Grants.   ASF will make 12 awards to autism stakeholders to cover expenses related to attending the International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR) in Toronto, Canada in May 2012. After the conference, grant recipients will share what they have learned with families in their local communities or online.

This year’s recipients are:

  • Catherine Blackwell – Sibling
  • Debra Dunn – Parent, Center for Autism Research at CHOP
  • Eric Hogan Self Identified Individual with Autism
  • Eshan Hoque – PhD Candidate, MIT
  • Kadi Lichsinger – Parent
  • Marjorie Madfis – Parent
  • Jon Shestack – Parent, Founder of Cure Autism Now
  • Mark Shen – PhD Candidate, UC Davis MIND Institute
  • Melissa Shimek Self Identified Individual with Autism
  • Meghan Swanson – PhD Candidate, Hunter College/City University of New York (CUNY)
  • Meagan Thompson – PhD Candidate, Boston University
  • Emily Willingham – Parent , Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism Blog

IMFAR is an annual scientific meeting, convened each spring, to share the latest scientific findings in autism research and to stimulate research progress in understanding the nature, causes, and treatments for autism spectrum disorders. IMFAR is the annual meeting of the International Society for Autism Research (INSAR).

“We are delighted to bring so many autism stakeholders to IMFAR so they can share their real world  experience with scientists,” said Alison Singer, President of the Autism Science Foundation. “Our travel grant program has become more and more popular over the past three years and we are thrilled to be able to increase the number of awards offered this year.”

The International Society for Autism Research (INSAR) is a scientific and professional organization devoted to advancing knowledge about autism spectrum disorders. Founded in 2001, INSAR runs the annual scientific meeting – the International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR)– and publishes the research journal “Autism Research.”

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How often have you wished for an extra hour or extra day to get everything you need done? In 2012, we get a WHOLE DAY! At ASF, we want to make the most of this special leap day by using it to help autism science leap forward.

Thanks to your support, for the last two years we have provided funding for autism stakeholders (parents, individuals with autism, teachers, students, etc) to attend the International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR).

All donations made today, February 29, 2012, will go directly to our IMFAR Travel Grants program, helping us provide more scholarships to IMFAR 2012 in Toronto where they will share their real world autism experience with scientists. These stakeholders will then bring the latest autism science back into our communities helping the science take a giant leap forward.

After attending IMFAR, past grant recipients have:

  • Organized a five day autism science seminar at Barnard College
  • Presented critical autism research information to nurses in Philadelphia
  • Produced multiple blog posts that reached thousands of readers around the world
  • Organized an autism awareness club and speaker series at Yale University

And thanks to a generous donor, all donations made today (February 29, 2012) will be matched dollar for dollar for an extra big leap.

Do something special with this extra day of 2012 and help leap science forward. Please make a donation today!

BTW – It’s no coincidence that applications for our IMFAR travel grants are due today. Thinking of applying? Click here to learn more.

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(August 18, 2011—New York, NY)–The Autism Science Foundation, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to supporting and funding autism research, today announced that it had issued a new request for scientific proposals. ASF is inviting applications for Pre- and Postdoctoral Training Awards from graduate students, medical students and postdoctoral fellows interested in pursuing careers in basic and clinical research relevant to autism spectrum disorders. In the past two years, ASF has funded over $400,000 in pre- and postdoctoral grants.

“This is one of our most important funding mechanisms” said Alison Singer, president of the Autism Science Foundation. “The pre- and postdoctoral fellowships not only build our knowledge about what causes autism and how best to treat it, but also build our future by encouraging outstanding young investigators to dedicate their careers to autism research.”

“Outstanding research is the greatest gift we can offer our families” said Karen London, ASF co-founder. “We are so grateful to all our donors and volunteers who have come together to support autism research and who make these grants possible.”

The proposed training must be scientifically linked to autism. Autism Science Foundation will consider for training purposes all areas of related basic and clinical research including but not limited to: human behavior across the lifespan (language, learning, communication, social function, epilepsy, sleep, repetitive disorders), neurobiology (anatomy, development, neuro-imaging), pharmacology, neuropathology, human genetics/genomics, immunology, molecular and cellular mechanisms, studies employing model organisms and systems, and studies of treatment and service delivery. Applications must be received by November 18, 2011.

Additional information about the RFA can be found at www.autismsciencefoundation.org/ApplyForaGrant.html

The Autism Science Foundation is a 501(c)(3) public charity. Its mission is to support autism research by providing funding to scientists and organizations conducting, facilitating, publicizing and disseminating autism research. The organization also provides information about autism to the general public and serves to increase awareness of autism spectrum disorders and the needs of individuals and families affected by autism.

Grant applications will be reviewed by members of ASF’s Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) and other highly qualified reviewers. Current SAB members include Dr. Joseph Buxbaum (Mt. Sinai School of Medicine); Dr. Emanuel DiCicco-Bloom (UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School); Dr. Sharon Humiston (University of Rochester); Dr. Bryan King (University of Washington, Seattle); Dr. Ami Klin (Emory University); Dr. Harold Koplewicz (The Child Mind Institute); Dr. Eric London (New York Institute for Basic Research); Dr. Catherine Lord (New York Institute for Brain Development); Dr. David Mandell (University of Pennsylvania/CHOP); and Dr. Matthew State (Yale Medical School).

To learn more about the Autism Science Foundation’s grant programs, and to read about projects funded through this mechanism in prior years, visit www.autismsciencefoundation.org/ApplyForaGrant.html

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Media Contact Info:

Dawn Crawford
Autism Science Foundation
dcrawford@autismsciencefoundation.org

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